Sponsored by DocMD


| DISCLAIMER   |  E-MAIL US  |
2001-2020 DocMD.com, Inc.

 
Dhonneur G. Kirov K. Slavov V. Duvaldestin P., Effects of an intubating dose of succinylcholine and rocuronium on the larynx and diaphragm: an electromyographic study in humans. Anesthesiology. 90(4):951-5, 1999.
The authors compared the neuromuscular blocking effect of succinylcholine and rocuronium on the larynx, the diaphragm, and the adductor pollicis muscle. Electromyographic response was used to compare the neuromuscular blocking effect of succinylcholine and rocuronium on the laryngeal adductor muscles, the diaphragm, and the adductor pollicis muscle. Sixteen patients undergoing elective surgery were anesthetized with propofol and fentanyl, and their tracheas were intubated without neuromuscular blocking agents. The recurrent laryngeal and phrenic nerves were stimulated at the neck. The electromyographic response was recorded from electrodes placed on the endotracheal tube and intercostally before and after administration of 1 mg/kg succinylcholine or 0.6 mg/kg rocuronium. The maximum effect was greater at the adductor pollicis (100 and 99%) than at the larynx (96 and 97%) and the diaphragm (94 and 96%) after administration of succinylcholine and rocuronium, respectively (P < or = 0.05). Onset time was not different between the larynx (58+/-10 s), the diaphragm (57+/-8 s), and the adductor pollicis (54+/-13 s), after succinylcholine (all mean +/- SD). After rocuronium, onset time was 124+/-39 s at the larynx, 130+/-44 s at the diaphragm, and 115+/-21 s at the adductor pollicis. After succinylcholine administration, time to 90% recovery was 8.3+/-3.2, 7.2+/-3.5, and 9.1+/-3.0 min at the larynx, the diaphragm, and the adductor pollicis, respectively. Time to 90% recovery after rocuronium administration was 34.9+/-7.6, 30.4+/-4.2, and 49.1+/-11.4 min at the larynx, the diaphragm, and the adductor pollicis, respectively. The authors conclude that neuromuscular blocking effect of muscle relaxants on the larynx can be measured noninvasively by electromyography. Although the larynx appears to be resistant to muscle relaxants, the authors could not demonstrate that its onset time differed from that of peripheral muscles.
back to article summaries
Rocuronium Home
go to next article
   
 
prescribing info - article summaries - drug info - slide shows - medline access - links - commentary - pda software - disclaimer - contact